All that matters

Q. 1. What is the chief end of man?
A. Man’s chief end is to glorify God,[1] and to enjoy him forever.[2]

So says the very first question of the Westminster Shorter Catechism. This statement of belief has long been held by virtually every conservative denomination since the reformation began. In the London Baptist Confession, the Baptists mirrored the Westminster Confession almost exactly to show that though they differed in some areas, the majority was in direct alignment and unity with the Reformed – We are to give God glory.

Revelation 4:11
“Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honour and power: for thou hast created all things, and for thy pleasure they are and were created.”

God is worth to receive glory and in all we do we are to render it to Him.

1 Corinthians 10:31
“Whether therefore ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God.”

All to God’s glory. Oh, what simple verse to say and to memorize, but do we think what it even means. Do we take a drink for the glory of God, or because we are thirsty? Do we eat because “breakfast is the most important meal of the day” or for the glory of God? It is in this simple motive that we discover there are no gray areas in life. Those supposed moments or middle ground decisions that cannot be judged to be either bad or good quickly become so when passed under the filter of God’s glory.

Proverbs 21:4
“An high look, and a proud heart, and the plowing of the wicked, is sin.”

Ah, the plowing of the wicked is sin. The simple task that is not even really one of those middle ground tasks, but rather what would be considered a positive good thing. The person is working to supply for himself. He is using the hands and strength God had given him to be a steward of what he has so that it does not go to waste, so that there is provision. He is doing a good thing, and yet it is sin. Why is this the case? Why is it that even when unsaved people appear moral they are not? Why is it when the lost appear to behave better than the saved that they are and will be found guilty before God?

Because all must be done to the glory of God. Without this driving motive in our lives we will find our motive is an idol – anything that has taken God’s place. To take a drink apart from God’s glory says we are not mindful that we belong to Him, that we are not presenting our bodies a living sacrifice which is our reasonable service. To decide between the red cups over the blue cups for the glory of God, we have done good: a good act – one with moral righteousness. God deserves that. God is worthy to receive all glory, and honor, and praise. Romans 14 tells us that to eat or not eat the meat to God’s glory is right; it is he that doubts that is in trouble. To observe the day or not to observe the day, it is not the action that matters in these things but why the action is chosen. Is it chose for the glory of God? Do I act and speak and think for any other purpose? The plowing of the wicked is sin. There is no rightness in anything apart from God’s glory.

How easily we can forget this! How easily we neglect to think about God through our days. How often we sinfully relegate God to a time of “devotions” however long we may make it when God desires and is worth of our every moment. The elders and beasts do not sing that He desires or requires this, but that He is worthy of it. God does require this of us but the greater motivation should be that God is worthy of this. When we see God revealed for who He is, we recognize that He is worthy of our every thought, and motive. He is worthy.

Some things we see as things that are neither right or wrong, but perhaps we are running them through the wrong filter. Are we using the filter of specific commandments? Are we using the filter of Christian liberty? Are we using the filter of the weaker brother? Are we considering God’s glory in it? This last question will take care of the rest, and we might just find that some of the neutral things we are doing are not so neutral.
“Thou art worthy, O Lord, to receive glory and honour and power: for thou hast created all things, and for thy pleasure they are and were created.”

“Whether therefore ye eat, or drink, or whatsoever ye do, do all to the glory of God.”

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